fbpx

This Week's Film Reviews (Jun 23, 2017)

23 Jun 2017

 

FILM REVIEWS:

47 METRES DOWN (UK 2017) ***1/2

Directed by Johannes Roberts

47 METRES DOWN, directed by Johannes Roberts and written by Roberts and Ernest Riera is a British horror thriller adventure about two sisters stuck in a shark cage 47 metres under the sea.  There is nothing British about the film that can be noticed.  The lead actor, Mandy Moore is American and her sister is played by Australian Claire Holt losing her Aussie accent.  The only hint at British is the film’s title or it would be called 47 (or the equivalent in conversion) Feet Down.

The story follows sisters Lisa (Moore) and Kate (Holt) on vacation in Mexico.  Lisa's boyfriend has broken up with her because "she made the relationship boring".  While drinking and dancing at 1:00 a.m, they meet up with some local men who tell them about cage diving with sharks.  Lisa is reluctant but Kate convinces her to come along.  The men arrive and talk to Captain Taylor (Matthew Modine).  The girls follow and both lie about being experienced divers even though only Kate knows how to dive.  While under water, the winch breaks and the cage plummets below.  Their oxygen slowly runs out while they fight against time and the sharks to be rescued with a spare winch.

Moore and Holt keep their characters in focus - balancing humour and terror.  Matthew Modine, now in his fifties, still looks charming as Captain Taylor.

Roberts keeps his film exciting from start to finish with a solid pace that never lets up.  The first time the full body of a shark is seen is when it suddenly appears a third through the film, swallowing the camera the girl dropped from the cage.  The ending contains a twist that will surprise.  The film is never short of scary set-ups.  After the broken winch is fixed, the rope breaks.   Roberts also knows how scary it can be in a dark scary sea where one cannot see the light from the surface or the ocean floor.  Being lost underwater is much scarier than being lost in space.  The film’s best and scariest scene is Kate swimming with a flashlight in the dark waters with nothing in sight but darkness.

The lean script omits details.  Nothing is known of the sisters’ background, where they work or which American city they come from, except for mention of Lisa’s never seen boyfriend.

Why would two girls want to under extreme danger in a shark cage?  The script spends time explaining the reason.  One is that Lisa needs to prove to herself that she is not as boring as her boyfriend.  The second is Kate insisting that they have a good time together and the third is the attraction of seeing sharks up close.  The fascination is heightened in a scene where sharks go on a feeding frenzy devouring a bucket full of bloody fish parts.

The film is sufficiently cheesy to be fun.  The skimpy costumes, the stereotyped locals and the clear ocean waters and white beaches are what can be expected 

On the business side, the $5 million lean production has already grossed more than $13 million after the first week of release.  

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddYSGGJAKOk

THE B-SIDE: ELSA DORFMAN’S PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY (USA 2017) ***
Directed by Errol Morris

The B-SIDE displays documentarian Errol Morris, known for his darker subjects like MR. DEATH and  THE FOG OF WAR in lighter mode with Polaroid Artist, an always cheery Elsa Dorfman,

Elsa Dorfman, the subject of Errol Morris’s new documentary appears at the film’s start, in light mode, at her Cambridge, Massachusetts studio talking to the camera.  The telephone rings at the midst of her talking and she asks whether she should answer the phone.  She is given the ok and ends up speaking to both the person on the telephone and to the audience.  The B-SIDE is a documentary about photographer portraitist Elsa Dorfman.  Dorfman who used the large-size Polaroid 20”x24” camera for over 30 years to take thousands of portraits, including those of old friends like poet Allen Ginsberg and singer Jonathan Richman.  Other famous people photographed include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Robert Lowell, W.H. Auden.  Now 80 (late 70s when the film was shot), she opens up her archives and memories.

The film takes its title from the music industry term “b-side.”  When using the Polaroid camera, Dorman would take two photos, keeping the rejected one for herself.  Sometimes the b-side can surprise. 

Most of the screen time is devoted to her talking about her life and work as well as answering questions asked on camera by Morris.  The film has a causal easy-going look, but the material is in no way compromised.  Morris gets as much material into his documentary this way.

Unlike many documentaries, Morris does not include many talking heads.  The only person doing the talking is Elsa Dorman herself.  

Elsa is a person who giggles a lot on screen, like a schoolgirl.  Though irritating at the beginning, her mannerisms slowly grows on you.  Elsa eventually comes across as a pleasant and clever person who deserves to have her say, even of herself rather than having others talk about her.

Elsa is shown to be quite opinionated.  She openly displays her disgust at the buyers of the Polaroid Company when it went bankrupt due to technology.  She always considers herself as a nice Jewish girl.

Much can be told about her character and about her relationships from her sayings.  She mentioned that her husband would pose for her regardless of how busy he is, even though he might only wish her a Happy Birthday at the end of the day.  But this shows a lot  - that Harvey and Elsa are truly in love as he would go out of the way to pose for her whew asked.  She also mentioned a really bad day, the one on the telephone when her father died and mother said goodbye to him.

Music includes a song Broken Blue Bones, written and performed by Allan Ginsberg.  Ginsberg, a close friend of Elsa, is featured in many of her photographs.  Ginsberg, given more screen time comported to others, definitely had an impact on her, as a friend and fellow artist.

As Elsa Dorfman is not that famous outside her circle - Morris’ film will give her some well deserved exposure, pardon the pun!

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSOazX_RiOI

THE BAD BATCH (USA 2016) **
Directed by Ana Lily Amirpour

Writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour is best remembered for her breakout animated vampire feature A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT that featured strong visuals.  She returns with another female protagonist sort-of vampire horror feature, this time set in a land of cannibals.

The BAD BATCH is a gruesome watch especially in its first 15 minutes.  The film is tamed down after that, fortunately or unfortunately, depending on how one looks at it.  In its first 15 minutes, Arlen (British model Suki Waterhouse) leaves Texas, U.S. and enters a no man’s land of toxic waste and odd communities.  One is cannibal community where she is captured unconscious.  Her lower arm and leg are sawed off and barbecued as a meal.  She escapes on a skateboard, lying sideways while using her one arm and leg to propel herself.  Quite the horrific sight, which is unmatched after.

Amipour has progressed to this $6 million production that displays  excellent production values.  The art and set direction is excellent from the crows that peck and pick out the body parts of the corpses in the desert to the piles of toxic waste that fill the landscape.  Amirpour has also cast known name actors in this film - Giovanni Ribisi, Keanu Reeves and Jim Carrey.  But these three are highly unrecognizable, so it is best to carefully to watch out for them.  

The film is set in a dystopian future America, where undesirables – the bad batch (they have numbers tattoo’ed on them) – are banished to a fenced-in desert outside the Texas territory, their US citizenship revoked.  One of the condemned is twentysomething Arlen (Waterhouse).  

After Arlen escapes from the cannibals losing one leg and an arm, she stays at Comfort, a hedonistic community run by a cult leader (Reeves).  Over the next few months, as Arlen adjusts to the “bad batch” life, she discovers that being good or bad mostly depends on who’s standing next to you.  She enters again the cannibal community to exact revenge, killing off a mother while adopting the motherless daughter (Jayda Pink).  The husband, a hunky cannibal with the words ‘Miami Man’ tattoo’ed across his chest comes hunting for them.  Arlen falls in love with him.  The film takes a different turn.

The main trouble with the film are the loose ends and credibility of the script.  What is Arlen’s background and what was her sentence?  Her falling in love with Miami Man stretches credibility.  Why would the little girl who witnesses Arlen’s shooting of her mother go on to live amicably with her?  And most important of all, why does Arlen have a change of heart?

The film boats a diverse soundtrack that includes oldies like Culture Club’s Karma-Chameleon, Ace of Base’s All that She Wants and a killer soundtrack by electronic duo Darkside.

The film won the Special Jury Prize at Venice 2016 and it is easy to see why.  Despite its flaws it shows great originality, look and attention to set and art details.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUqfP1S-9ok

FILM PREVIEW OF COCO (Opening November 2017)

This morning (Friday 23rd June, 2017) at the TIFF Bell Lightbox, film critics were treated to a delicious breakfast and presentation preview of Disney Pixar’s latest animated feature COCO to open coming November.

Coco is a 3D computer-animated fantasy adventure film based on an original idea by Lee Unkrich.  The film is directed by Unkrich, and co-directed and written by Adrian Molina.

The plot involves a 12-year old Miguel (voiced by newcomer Anthony Gonzalez) whose family has banned music as his great, great grandfather had left his family to become a great musician.  Despite his family's generation-old ban on music, Miguel dreams of becoming an accomplished musician like his idol Ernesto de la Cruz. Desperate to prove his talent, Miguel finds himself in the Land of the Dead.  The Festival of the Dead is celebrated in Mexico for the time when the dead crosses the border to be with the living.  Along the way, he meets charming trickster Hector (Gael Garcia Bernal) and together they set off on an extraordinary journey to unlock the real story behind Miguel's family history.

The presentation was supposed to be presented by the film’s two directors and Academy Award-winning producer Darla K. Anderson.  But  Lee Unkrich had to stay behind to finish the film, so co-director Molina and Anderson were left, but they did deliver an awesome presentation.

The presentation began by showing the first 10 minutes of COCO’s opening, where the history of his family and the ban of music originated.  The last part of the piece is still not coloured and shown in storyboard form.  But one cannot mistake the magic of Disney, present throughout the 10 minutes.  The finished product will undoubtedly be something unforgettable.

Other clips include Coco at the singing competition and another with Coco and his pal, Hector in the Land of the Dead.  The common thread in all of these is the magnificent colour palette that makes COCO standout among other Pixar features.

Besides clips from the film, there is a clip that showed Disney staff surprising Anthony Gonzalez that he got the part for voicing Miguel.  This clip shows the family atmosphere of Disney that makes the Studio great.

Co-director Molina’s mother is Mexican, so he bring a lot of his own heritage into the film.  A troupe of COCO’s filmmakers also travelled and stayed in Mexico for a time, according to what was said during he presentation.

The presentation concluded with a Question and Answer section with the critics - nothing to write home about, since us critics are not the most imaginative people alive, questions or what not.

COCO opens in November and is certainly going to be an event to watch out for.  Do click on the link below to watch the trailer for COCO.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xlnPHQ3TLX8

THE HERO (USA 2017) **

Directed by Brett Haley

THE HERO is directed by Brett Haley who also directed I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS another romantic drama with a senior protagonist.  THE HERO is a more serious venture as its main character an ageing star called Lee Hayden (Sam Elliot) has just diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and he has to comes to terms with his life and legacy.

When THE HERO begins, Lee Hayden stands on the beach watching the waves of the ocean roll on shore.  It is a familiar scene to those familiar with the films of Sam Elliot.  That scene is reminiscent of one of Elliot’s most successful films - THE LIFEGUARD in which he plays the title role of a lifeguard.  He sports the same bushy moustache in that film as in THE HERO, a facial feature that made his Lee Hayden character famous.

THE HERO begins on a very pessimistic note.  Besides just being diagnosed with cancer, Lee is a listless character, always smoking weed or getting high on mushrooms.  He is trying to come to grip with his relationship with his daughter Lucy (Krysten Ritter).  He does the odd commercial (like the BBQ sauce radio commercial that bookends the story).  The rest of the time is spent hanging out with his drug dealer buddy.

When things get this bad, nothing can get worse.  So when Lee finds a girl half his age responding to his request of a date, he slowly gets his spirits uplifted.  The two eventually end up in bed.  At this point in the film, the film’s pessimism disappears.  And one can see why.  It is an ageing man’s fantasy to have a young girl fall in love (and having sex) with him.  But when he visits her at a club doing stand-up comedy, her jokes on making love with an older man turns him off understandably, and he storms off.

At one point in the film the two attend his life achievement award presentation.  His speech goes viral giving him instant fame for a short period of time.  He gets a film audition which he goes to read a script.  The script concerns a father being rejected by his daughter, obviously a reflection of what is happening to Lee in real life.  As expected, he cannot go through reading the script emotionally, breaking down and losing the part.

It is unclear where Haley’s film is leading only till the very last third of the film.  It is frustrating to watch the film go from pessimism to optimism back to pessimism and then hope again.  Lee’s speech at his achievement awards ceremony is preachy, him talking about life and people being grains of sand - enough of the metaphors.

The biggest metaphor of all is the film reflecting the real life of actor Sam Elliot.  Elliot is himself a character just like Lee Hayden, fairly but no too famous whose life body of films could have gotten him a  lifetime achievement award in some small film community.

THE HERO ends up as another sad feature about an old fart who should but cannot get a hold of his own life.  It is difficult to feel sympathetic for someone who smokes weed half the time and fails to meet up with expectations when given a second chance.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiKtUnI0u4U

 

47 METRES DOWN (UK 2017) ***1/2

Directed by Johannes Roberts

47 METRES DOWN, directed by Johannes Roberts and written by Roberts and Ernest Riera is a British horror thriller adventure about two sisters stuck in a shark cage 47 metres under the sea.  There is nothing British about the film that can be noticed.  The lead actor, Mandy Moore is American and her sister is played by Australian Claire Holt losing her Aussie accent.  The only hint at British is the film’s title or it would be called 47 (or the equivalent in conversion) Feet Down.

The story follows sisters Lisa (Moore) and Kate (Holt) on vacation in Mexico.  Lisa's boyfriend has broken up with her because "she made the relationship boring".  While drinking and dancing at 1:00 a.m, they meet up with some local men who tell them about cage diving with sharks.  Lisa is reluctant but Kate convinces her to come along.  The men arrive and talk to Captain Taylor (Matthew Modine).  The girls follow and both lie about being experienced divers even though only Kate knows how to dive.  While under water, the winch breaks and the cage plummets below.  Their oxygen slowly runs out while they fight against time and the sharks to be rescued with a spare winch.

Moore and Holt keep their characters in focus - balancing humour and terror.  Matthew Modine, now in his fifties, still looks charming as Captain Taylor.

Roberts keeps his film exciting from start to finish with a solid pace that never lets up.  The first time the full body of a shark is seen is when it suddenly appears a third through the film, swallowing the camera the girl dropped from the cage.  The ending contains a twist that will surprise.  The film is never short of scary set-ups.  After the broken winch is fixed, the rope breaks.   Roberts also knows how scary it can be in a dark scary sea where one cannot see the light from the surface or the ocean floor.  Being lost underwater is much scarier than being lost in space.  The film’s best and scariest scene is Kate swimming with a flashlight in the dark waters with nothing in sight but darkness.

The lean script omits details.  Nothing is known of the sisters’ background, where they work or which American city they come from, except for mention of Lisa’s never seen boyfriend.

Why would two girls want to under extreme danger in a shark cage?  The script spends time explaining the reason.  One is that Lisa needs to prove to herself that she is not as boring as her boyfriend.  The second is Kate insisting that they have a good time together and the third is the attraction of seeing sharks up close.  The fascination is heightened in a scene where sharks go on a feeding frenzy devouring a bucket full of bloody fish parts.

The film is sufficiently cheesy to be fun.  The skimpy costumes, the stereotyped locals and the clear ocean waters and white beaches are what can be expected 

On the business side, the $5 million lean production has already grossed more than $13 million after the first week of release.  

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ddYSGGJAKOk

THE B-SIDE: ELSA DORFMAN’S PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY (USA 2017) ***
Directed by Errol Morris

The B-SIDE displays documentarian Errol Morris, known for his darker subjects like MR. DEATH and  THE FOG OF WAR in lighter mode with Polaroid Artist, an always cheery Elsa Dorfman,

Elsa Dorfman, the subject of Errol Morris’s new documentary appears at the film’s start, in light mode, at her Cambridge, Massachusetts studio talking to the camera.  The telephone rings at the midst of her talking and she asks whether she should answer the phone.  She is given the ok and ends up speaking to both the person on the telephone and to the audience.  The B-SIDE is a documentary about photographer portraitist Elsa Dorfman.  Dorfman who used the large-size Polaroid 20”x24” camera for over 30 years to take thousands of portraits, including those of old friends like poet Allen Ginsberg and singer Jonathan Richman.  Other famous people photographed include Bob Dylan, Joni Mitchell, Robert Lowell, W.H. Auden.  Now 80 (late 70s when the film was shot), she opens up her archives and memories.

The film takes its title from the music industry term “b-side.”  When using the Polaroid camera, Dorman would take two photos, keeping the rejected one for herself.  Sometimes the b-side can surprise. 

Most of the screen time is devoted to her talking about her life and work as well as answering questions asked on camera by Morris.  The film has a causal easy-going look, but the material is in no way compromised.  Morris gets as much material into his documentary this way.

Unlike many documentaries, Morris does not include many talking heads.  The only person doing the talking is Elsa Dorman herself.  

Elsa is a person who giggles a lot on screen, like a schoolgirl.  Though irritating at the beginning, her mannerisms slowly grows on you.  Elsa eventually comes across as a pleasant and clever person who deserves to have her say, even of herself rather than having others talk about her.

Elsa is shown to be quite opinionated.  She openly displays her disgust at the buyers of the Polaroid Company when it went bankrupt due to technology.  She always considers herself as a nice Jewish girl.

Much can be told about her character and about her relationships from her sayings.  She mentioned that her husband would pose for her regardless of how busy he is, even though he might only wish her a Happy Birthday at the end of the day.  But this shows a lot  - that Harvey and Elsa are truly in love as he would go out of the way to pose for her whew asked.  She also mentioned a really bad day, the one on the telephone when her father died and mother said goodbye to him.

Music includes a song Broken Blue Bones, written and performed by Allan Ginsberg.  Ginsberg, a close friend of Elsa, is featured in many of her photographs.  Ginsberg, given more screen time comported to others, definitely had an impact on her, as a friend and fellow artist.

As Elsa Dorfman is not that famous outside her circle - Morris’ film will give her some well deserved exposure, pardon the pun!

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSOazX_RiOI

THE BAD BATCH (USA 2016) **
Directed by Ana Lily Amirpour

Writer/director Ana Lily Amirpour is best remembered for her breakout animated vampire feature A GIRL WALKS HOME ALONE AT NIGHT that featured strong visuals.  She returns with another female protagonist sort-of vampire horror feature, this time set in a land of cannibals.

The BAD BATCH is a gruesome watch especially in its first 15 minutes.  The film is tamed down after that, fortunately or unfortunately, depending on how one looks at it.  In its first 15 minutes, Arlen (British model Suki Waterhouse) leaves Texas, U.S. and enters a no man’s land of toxic waste and odd communities.  One is cannibal community where she is captured unconscious.  Her lower arm and leg are sawed off and barbecued as a meal.  She escapes on a skateboard, lying sideways while using her one arm and leg to propel herself.  Quite the horrific sight, which is unmatched after.

Amipour has progressed to this $6 million production that displays  excellent production values.  The art and set direction is excellent from the crows that peck and pick out the body parts of the corpses in the desert to the piles of toxic waste that fill the landscape.  Amirpour has also cast known name actors in this film - Giovanni Ribisi, Keanu Reeves and Jim Carrey.  But these three are highly unrecognizable, so it is best to carefully to watch out for them.  

The film is set in a dystopian future America, where undesirables – the bad batch (they have numbers tattoo’ed on them) – are banished to a fenced-in desert outside the Texas territory, their US citizenship revoked.  One of the condemned is twentysomething Arlen (Waterhouse).  

After Arlen escapes from the cannibals losing one leg and an arm, she stays at Comfort, a hedonistic community run by a cult leader (Reeves).  Over the next few months, as Arlen adjusts to the “bad batch” life, she discovers that being good or bad mostly depends on who’s standing next to you.  She enters again the cannibal community to exact revenge, killing off a mother while adopting the motherless daughter (Jayda Pink).  The husband, a hunky cannibal with the words ‘Miami Man’ tattoo’ed across his chest comes hunting for them.  Arlen falls in love with him.  The film takes a different turn.

The main trouble with the film are the loose ends and credibility of the script.  What is Arlen’s background and what was her sentence?  Her falling in love with Miami Man stretches credibility.  Why would the little girl who witnesses Arlen’s shooting of her mother go on to live amicably with her?  And most important of all, why does Arlen have a change of heart?

The film boats a diverse soundtrack that includes oldies like Culture Club’s Karma-Chameleon, Ace of Base’s All that She Wants and a killer soundtrack by electronic duo Darkside.

The film won the Special Jury Prize at Venice 2016 and it is easy to see why.  Despite its flaws it shows great originality, look and attention to set and art details.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OUqfP1S-9ok

THE HERO (USA 2017) **

Directed by Brett Haley

THE HERO is directed by Brett Haley who also directed I’LL SEE YOU IN MY DREAMS another romantic drama with a senior protagonist.  THE HERO is a more serious venture as its main character an ageing star called Lee Hayden (Sam Elliot) has just diagnosed with pancreatic cancer, and he has to comes to terms with his life and legacy.

When THE HERO begins, Lee Hayden stands on the beach watching the waves of the ocean roll on shore.  It is a familiar scene to those familiar with the films of Sam Elliot.  That scene is reminiscent of one of Elliot’s most successful films - THE LIFEGUARD in which he plays the title role of a lifeguard.  He sports the same bushy moustache in that film as in THE HERO, a facial feature that made his Lee Hayden character famous.

THE HERO begins on a very pessimistic note.  Besides just being diagnosed with cancer, Lee is a listless character, always smoking weed or getting high on mushrooms.  He is trying to come to grip with his relationship with his daughter Lucy (Krysten Ritter).  He does the odd commercial (like the BBQ sauce radio commercial that bookends the story).  The rest of the time is spent hanging out with his drug dealer buddy.

When things get this bad, nothing can get worse.  So when Lee finds a girl half his age responding to his request of a date, he slowly gets his spirits uplifted.  The two eventually end up in bed.  At this point in the film, the film’s pessimism disappears.  And one can see why.  It is an ageing man’s fantasy to have a young girl fall in love (and having sex) with him.  But when he visits her at a club doing stand-up comedy, her jokes on making love with an older man turns him off understandably, and he storms off.

At one point in the film the two attend his life achievement award presentation.  His speech goes viral giving him instant fame for a short period of time.  He gets a film audition which he goes to read a script.  The script concerns a father being rejected by his daughter, obviously a reflection of what is happening to Lee in real life.  As expected, he cannot go through reading the script emotionally, breaking down and losing the part.

It is unclear where Haley’s film is leading only till the very last third of the film.  It is frustrating to watch the film go from pessimism to optimism back to pessimism and then hope again.  Lee’s speech at his achievement awards ceremony is preachy, him talking about life and people being grains of sand - enough of the metaphors.

The biggest metaphor of all is the film reflecting the real life of actor Sam Elliot.  Elliot is himself a character just like Lee Hayden, fairly but no too famous whose life body of films could have gotten him a  lifetime achievement award in some small film community.

THE HERO ends up as another sad feature about an old fart who should but cannot get a hold of his own life.  It is difficult to feel sympathetic for someone who smokes weed half the time and fails to meet up with expectations when given a second chance.

Trailer: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RiKtUnI0u4U

Comments powered by CComment

Search Site

Latest Articles

Apr 03, 2021

Building a professional art space for Toronto's black community

in Arts by Meres J. Weche
Alica Hall is the Executive Director of the Nia Centre for the Arts — Canada's… Read more >>
Mar 23, 2021

Community empowerment through the Black Opportunity Fund

in Community by News Editor
Spearheaded by a coalition of black Canadian executives and established in… Read more >>
Feb 03, 2021

How it feels to be free

in Movies by Meres J. Weche
We recently lost a giant of the silver screen with the passing, at the age of… Read more >>
Nov 22, 2020

Keeping arts & culture alive during the pandemic

in Arts by Meres J. Weche
Born in Kingston, Jamaica and currently based in Ajax, Ontario, social… Read more >>
Oct 05, 2020

Dance for the people

in Arts by Meres J. Weche
Broadway tap dance performer Lisa La Touche talks about her Fall for Dance… Read more >>

Latest on Instagram

Featured Events

No events found.

Join Our Mailing List

Advertise with us

Subscribe to podcast

Find a Job

AfroToronto.com participates in affiliate marketing programs, which means we may earn a commission if you purchase an item featured on our site. These affiliate links, along with advertisements, support us and they come to no expense for you.

Media Kit | Member Access

Privacy Policy | Cookie Policy | Terms and Conditions

Copyright © 2005-2021 Culture Shox Media. All rights reserved unless otherwise stated.